Strange Creek Campout 2012, Max Creek, Strangefolk, Carbon Leaf

Event Off Sale: Tickets no longer available

Wormtown Presents:

Strange Creek Campout 2012

Max Creek

Strangefolk

Carbon Leaf

Dopapod

Fri, May 25, 2012

Doors: 12:00 pm / Show: 1:00 pm

Camp Kee-Wanee

Greenfield, MA

$110.00

Off Sale

This event is all ages

ONLINE SALES HAVE STOPPED BUT THERE WILL BE A FEW TIX LEFT AT THE GATES. GATES OPEN 12PM FRIDAY 5/25.

Strange Creek Campout 2012
Strange Creek Campout 2012
Camp KeeWanee

Camp KeeWanee is located in Greenfield, MA, and is an inclusive summer day camp with an emphasis on the arts and the fostering of self-esteem. The camp has trails, Pavilions and Music Cabins. A portion of StrangeCreek Campout ticket proceeds go to benefit Camp KeeWanee, and the Wormtown Crew always gives back to help make the camp better and more beautiful every year.

Festival Features
* 3 nights of Wooded Camping
* Gates Open at 9am Friday, Campgrounds close at 1pm on Monday
* Community Bonfire
* Cabin Jams
* Vernville
* River Worm Cafe
* Roaming Entertainers
* Family Camping & Kids Entertainment
* Craft & Food Vendors
* Strangers Helping Strangers Food Drive

Basic Rules
(that we ask you to follow)
No Glass Bottles… Coolers are okay.
Please No Open Fires… Community Bonfires will be there again this year. So bring lots of drums!!!!
No Car Camping
Absolutely No Dogs will be allowed at the camp!

We try not forget this place is a Kids Camp for Music and The Arts. We are trying to protect and improve the land for the kids that will be attending the camp this summer. So, we’ll leave nothing but our footprints…
Max Creek
Max Creek
Purveyors of a Genre and a Way of Life, Max Creek Celebrates Their Fortieth! They Made It Through the Seventies, and They're Still Going.

Max Creek is a living, breathing historical study in a hugely significant yet too-oft overlooked American subculture: the jam band. Later this month, Max Creek celebrates their fortieth anniversary with a small East Coast tour, hitting intimate venues in Connecticut, Rhode Island, and New York City.

Creek guesses they've performed nearly 3,000 times over their forty years together. They have set lists for 1,851 shows covering the 80s and 90s but there are more shows, both known and unknown, than set lists still exist for. As with most jam bands and their fans, the majority of the 70s are gone. (What does this mean?)

Their first concert as a band was in May 1971 at the Maple View Ballroom (later Woody's) in Washington, MA, a venue at that time owned by Arlo Guthrie. The next three decades were characterized by endless bouts of touring, especially the late 70s and 80s. At their peak in 1982, Creek played 241 live shows. A true jam band, Max Creek and its fans know that the truest experience is the live show. During their long history, they've played some out of this world shows in some out of this world venues, including the Elmcrest Psychiatric Institute in Portland, CT in 1978.

In the early years, Creek toured almost exclusively in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and New York. Their first ventures into northern New England (New Hampshire and Maine) took place in 1981, and in 1983 they hit the road and took to Philadelphia then back up north to Vermont. Throughout the 80s, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine became regular tour stops along with the old mid-Atlantic standbys.

In 1989, they tapped the Mason Dixon line, venturing south to Virginia, North Carolina, Washington, D.C., Maryland, and back to Pennsylvania, adding the Keystone State to their regular tour stops. In 1991 they took a lengthy "ski" trip, playing in mountain towns across Colorado, including Steamboat Springs, Aspen, and Telluride. Later during the 90's they went several times to "the Promised Land" - California, where they played at classic venues such as the Great American Music Hall and Maritime Hall. Perhaps as a result of many year of traveling, they stuck around the East Coast for the rest of the 90s, had families, and played shows pockmarked by occasional westward excursions including to Ohio, and back to Colorado and California.

After this many years, they might have showed some signs of slowing down, but not by much. Earlier in 2011, they produced and participated in January's Jungle Jam in Costa Rica with the Grateful Dead's Bill Kreutzmann.

Seemingly unknown outside their home circuit of Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, and New York, with smaller followings throughout New England (though their annual Camp Creek summer festival is a big crowd-pleaser), Max Creek has fans that have, over the years, spread out and settled in far-flung regions of the country. They have brought tapes, CD's and other recordings to spread the gospel of the band that had become so large a part of their lives. Also, the band has been pivotally influential on an entire generation of jam bands, and their sound has defined much of the genre as we know it today. Interestingly, Phish did a live cover of the Max Creek song: Back Porch Boogie.

About Phish's cover, Max Creek's Scott Murawski says, "Mike Gordon wanted to do the song which is an instrumental bluegrass song but he knew Trey wouldn't want to cover a Max Creek song so he told the band he wrote it and they performed it." Whether or not Phish will admit the relationship, when you listen to Phish, you can definitely hear the Max Creek influence.

In real life, the band members are a church musical director (Mark Mercier – keyboards), video and event company employee (John Rider – bass), a TV and audio technician (Scott Allshouse – drums), an ADP account manager (Greg Vasso – drums), and a computer programmer (Scott Murawski – guitar). But as playing together for forty years proves, at heart, they are all musicians, and an integral part of a thriving, if under-the-radar, subculture. More than a band, Max Creek has become a major part of the lives of many of its followers over the years, and, like some in the jam band scene, a social phenomenon as much as a musical entity. Many members of its long-time audience liken coming to Max Creek concerts after an absence to "coming back home for Thanksgiving". In the eyes of both the band and their fans, the existence of the band runs much deeper than the music.

Max Creek has never played without a rubber duck somewhere on stage, usually on the bass amp.

Glide Magazine writer Shane Handler got it right when he issued high praise for Max Creek saying "Bands like Phish, moe., Blues Traveler, the Disco Biscuits and others are the trees in Max Creek's seeds of a thriving Northeast music scene that encourages live risk taking on stage and playing according to the feel of the present moment."
Strangefolk
Strangefolk
At the heart of Strangefolk's songwriting is a seamless blend of narrative lyrical content and inventive melody. In fact, the band's name refers to the layering of unusual guitar sounds, time sequences and melodies over a singer-songwriter styled lyrical foundation. Rock, folk, blues and bluegrass influences converge to create an instantly recognizable sound which keeps Strangefolk's listeners moving from start to finish. When punctuated with Strangefolk's trademark three-part harmonies and soaring lead guitar, the band's unique songwriting ability develops a natural avenue for the band to extend themselves in a live setting. The result is one of the more gratifying live music experiences around.
Carbon Leaf
Carbon Leaf
“Virginia natives Carbon Leaf weave their signature indie-rock blend of Celtic, Appalachian, folk, and country into a rousing new brand of music best described as ‘ether-electrified porch music’.

The five-man band's steadfast arrangement of guitar, bass, drums, and mandolin is rounded out with more exotic instruments, like the bouzouki, fiddle, accordion and penny whistle, all tied together by lead singer Barry Privett's bold, straightforward baritone.

Long beloved in their hometown of Richmond and known for high-energy live shows, the group entered onto the national scene in 2002 by winning an American Music Award with the Irish-tinged hit “The Boxer,” a narrative about a fighter who's at the top of his game but scraping the bottom of love's barrel.

Pioneering dreams, broken hearts, Love’s renewal - all traverse the American landscape as common themes in Carbon Leaf's music, as is reflected in the dark, bluesy “Another Man's Woman,” and “Miss Hollywood,” a Southern-twanged ballad about the angst of dating an enormous sign.”
Dopapod
Dopapod
Thumping up from basement parties in Boston, to bumping the sounds systems of major venues all across the east coast, Dopapod has been steadily growing as a musical tour-de-force for 3 years. Dopapod’s debut album, “Radar” has received critical acclaim from national publications such as Performer Magazine, calling Dopapod’s members “incredibly talented musicians”, and that the band has “set the bar respectfully high for their first full length recording”. Dopapod has shared the stage with many great bands and musicians such as Sam Kininger (Soulive, Lettuce), Lotus, Brothers Past, Biodeisel (Johnny Rabb) Dave Grippo (Phish, Trey Anastasio) Timo Shanko (G-Love n Special Sauce) Dana Colley (Morphine) Mr. Rourke (Club D'elf) and more. The summer of 2010 has had several festival appearances including Camp Bisco 9, Strange Creek, Liberate, The Big Up, Muddy River Jam Fest, Tweed River Music Festival, Mountain Jam, Weekend Off, and Headyfest. Dopapod has big plans for 2010, including a new album, and more east coast tours in the works. They are also in the process of moving to Brooklyn! As of now, Dopapod is preparing lots of new music in 'The Fort', somewhere in Pennsylvania
Venue Information:
Camp Kee-Wanee
1 Health Camp Road
Greenfield, MA, 13101